Be Mindful of Yourself

Be Mindful of Yourself

We’ve entered an era of occupational disruption.  No matter how successful we are, work is now more demanding, more stressful than at any other time in our careers.  In such an environment, there seems to be no time to relax and recharge or even to catch our breath.  And yet, if we don’t take care of ourselves, we run the very real risk of burning out.

For that reason, Career Activism incorporates a practice that’s come to be known as “mindfulness.”  It can sound a little “new agey” at first, but its principles are both physiologically and psychologically sound.

Mindfulness is a way to “pay attention to ourselves.”  Think of it as a painless flu shot for the pandemic of pressure and anxiety in today’s “doing more with less” workplace.

How is it performed?  As a schedule of regular breaks built, not around the water cooler or a Facebook visit, but around the soothing effects of body rhythms and peacefulness.

Research has shown that adults need a break every ninety minutes or so, if they are to keep themselves stimulated and performing at their peak.  And, they also need such breaks to repair themselves after the particularly stressful events that can occur from time-to-time in any career.

The mindful Career Activist uses these periodic breaks to focus on their breathing – on listening to the rhythm of their body.  If their respiration is at its normal pace, they concentrate on simply experiencing that gift of life.  And, if it’s ragged or rapid from the stress of the day, they slowly and steadily move it back to its natural state.

In both cases, they inhale to reinforce their spirit and sense of purpose in their work and exhale to eradicate the toxins of stress and anxiety that the workplace has produced.   With each breath in, they say quietly to themselves I remember who I am, and with each breathe out, they say I rejoice in who I am.

Mindfulness replaces the stress of a seemingly interminable list of job requirements with the physical and psychological peacefulness that comes from quietly paying attention to ourselves.  It counterbalances the debilitating effects of unreasonable bosses, unsupportive coworkers and unreachable business goals with a regular interval of healing self-affirmation.

Thanks for reading,
Peter