Feature: WEDDLE’s Annual Source of Employment Survey

Feature: WEDDLE’s Annual Source of Employment Survey

Feature: WEDDLE’s Annual Source of Employment Survey

Each year, WEDDLE’s analyzes the data supplied by visitors to its Web-site who answer a questionnaire that explores both their online and real world experience in finding a new or better job. We ask them to tell us where they found their last job and expect to find their next one in order to pinpoint which methods of job search work best in today’s economic climate and are likely work best in tomorrow’s. The results of the questionnaire provide what we call our annual Source of Employment Survey.

WEDDLE’s 2008 Source of Employment survey ran from March 2007 to March 2008 and generated responses from over 15,600 individuals. The respondents were 65% male, 35% female; they had a median age of 40-45, and they described their workplace experience level as follows:

  • 19.0% were managers,
  • 16.7% were mid-level professionals,
  • 15.5% were executives,
  • 15.1% were senior-level professionals,
  • 12.3% were entry-level professionals,
  • 11.0% were skilled tradespersons, and
  • 10.4% were administrative persons.
  • When asked to describe their employment situation,

  • 25.1% said they were currently employed, but actively looking for another job;
  • 22.6% said they were not currently employed and actively seeking a new job;
  • 20.9% said they were currently employed and thinking about make a job change this year;
  • 15.7% said they were reentering the job market after a prolonged absence (2+ years); and
  • 15.7% said they were employed and not planning to leave their current employer.
  • Where Did Survey Respondents Find Their Last Job

    When asked to identify where they found their last job, the respondents listed the following sources as their top ten (not all sources are listed so the percentages will not total to 100%):

  • 13.3% An ad posted on an Internet job board
  • 7.0% A tip from a friend
  • 6.8% Other
  • 6.3% A newspaper ad
  • 6.2% By posting their resume on a job board
  • 6.0% A call from a headhunter
  • 5.8% They were referred by an employee of the company
  • 5.2% They sent a resume to the company
  • 4.9% At a career fair
  • 4.8% By networking at work.
  • How do these findings compare to those of a year ago? An ad posted on an Internet job board was the highest ranked source last year, as well, but the percentage of respondents citing this source has almost doubled; it was 7.6% in 2007 compared to 13.3% in 2008. A tip from a friend was the second most cited source in 2007, as it was this year, but the third and fourth most cited sources in 2007-career fairs and a call from a headhunter-both dropped a bit in the rankings. Newspapers, on the other hand, gained a notch ,moving from the fifth most cited source in 2007 to the fourth most cited source in 2008, and the percentage of respondents citing newspapers went up , as well (from 5.7% in 2007 to 6.3% in 2008).

    What else did the survey uncover? Respondents gave a thumbs-down to two sources of employment that have generally been viewed more favorably by job search experts. Just 3.9% of the individuals in the poll said they found their last job:

  • through the publication of their professional association
  • or

  • on a social networking site.
  • Traditionally, associations have positioned their professional publications as a source of high caliber employment opportunities, and these findings, at least, suggest that those claims may not be completely justified. And, all of the brouhaha of late about the job search power of Facebook, Friendster, Xanga and other social networking sites appears to be more sound than fury, at least if the measure of merit is their ability to connect you with a new employment opportunity.

    Where Will Survey Respondents Look for Their Next Job

    When asked to indicate where they expect to find their next job, the respondents cited the following top five sources (not all sources are listed so the percentages will not total to 100%):

  • 19.0% said an ad posted on an Internet job board
  • 7.9% said posting their resume on a job board
  • 5.8% said sending their resume into the company
  • 5.6% said a call from a headhunter
  • 4.9% said by networking at work.
  • The top five sources in 2007 were:

  • An ad posted on an Internet job board (cited by 13.2% of respondents)
  • Posting a resume on a job board
  • Sending a resume into the company
  • A tip from a family member
  • A tip from a friend.
  • So, what does all of this mean? First, there is no silver bullet for finding a new or better job. Online resources are clearly effective, but they must be integrated with a range of other approaches to produce a truly effective job search strategy. And second, beware conventional wisdom. Not only do newspapers continue to offer effective connections to employment opportunities-despite much media blather to the contrary-but association publications and social networking sites are much less effective than other job search methods, despite all of the support they have had in the past and present. Anyway, that’s my take.

    Thanks for reading,

    Peter

    P.S. Please tell your friends and colleagues about the WEDDLE’s newsletter. As you know, we don’t follow the herd or the latest fad here. Instead, we deliver sound research, reliable information and savvy analysis. For free. And right to your e-mailbox. So please … share the experience.

    P.S.S. Don’t forget to send us your new e-mail address if you move. Lots of people are changing jobs these days and if you’re one of them, we want to be sure you still have the information in WEDDLE’s to help you manage your career effectively. All you have to do to keep your WEDDLE’s newsletter coming is send your change of address to pwj@weddles.com.

    This Issue’s Sponsor: WEDDLE’s Guide & Directory

    This issue of WEDDLE’s newsletter is brought to you through the generous support of WEDDLE’s Guides and Directory, the leading reference books for online job search success.

    You can follow the herd and go to the same job boards everyone else is visiting online or you can shop smart and find the job boards that are best suited for you. You can add your application to the hundreds of others being submitted for the jobs everyone else is seeing or you can find the special opportunities posted at lesser known job boards and career portals. The choice is yours.

    If you want to take the path less traveled and find a great job online, you’ll need the gold standard of job board guides: WEDDLE’s. WEDDLE’s publications are your road map to the best of the 50,000+ job boards now operating on the Internet. WEDDLE’s books include:

  • WEDDLE’s 2007/8 Guide to Employment Sites on the Internet. Called the “Zagat of the online employment industry” by the American Staffing Association, it provides full-page profiles of 350 of the best job boards in a range of occupations, industries and locations;
  • WEDDLE’s 2007/8 Directory of Employment Related Internet Sites. The “address book of the online employment industry,” it lists over 9,000 sites and organizes them by the career fields, industries and geographies on which they focus; and
  • WEDDLE’s 2007/8 Guide to Association Web Sites. The key to the “hidden job market” online, it details the employment resources and capabilities that are provided at the Web-sites of over 1,900 associations and societies.
  • These books are a smart investment for the smart professional. They provide a real and important competitive advantage in your search for a great job during a difficult economy. So, don’t delay! Click on the link to your left or call WEDDLE’s at 317.598.9768 and place your order today.

    Section Two: Site News You Can Use

    Best Life published an article on salary negotiation by Deepak Malhotra, author of Negotiation Genius. It’s hard enough these days to find a good job, but once you’re hired, it’s often just as challenging to make sure that your compensation is where it should be. What does the author suggest? First, speak up. According to Malhotra, we often accept whatever bonus or salary increase the organization proposes for us, rather than responding with a counter offer. To speak up on your own behalf, however, you have to do your homework first and know what figure is fair and appropriate for someone who has your skills and is making the kind of contribution you make. Second, the author says, it’s important to have a backup. Make sure you document all of your accomplishments and provide that record “as a reminder” to your boss before you get together for a meeting. And third, have a fall back plan. If your boss says the money just isn’t there to give you the raise or bonus you deserve, be prepared to ask for other recognition, such as additional vacation days or a trip to your professional association’s annual conference.

    CollegeGrad.com surveyed job postings on its own site to determine the top 500 entry level employers for 2008. Among the firms with the most openings are:

  • Enterprise Rent-A-Car
  • Lowe’s
  • Liberty Mutual Group
  • Sodexho
  • EMC
  • FactSet
  • hi5 Networks
  • Progressive Insurance
  • Fund for Public Interest Research
  • Grant Thornton.
  • What should you do with this list? Visit each employer’s Web-site and check out the information it provides on what it’s like to work there, the nature of the jobs it’s offering, the developmental opportunities it provides and its pathways for growth. The number one reason people don’t work out when they join a company is not that they can’t do the work, but that they don’t fit in. No matter how lucrative the starting salary may be, it’s most important that you understand and are comfortable with an organization’s culture and the content of the work it expects you to do.

    Staffing Industry Analysts, Inc. released its forecast of temporary employment prospects for 500 occupations. Why should you care? Because the American Staffing Association has found that 30% of those who take a temporary position with an employer are actually hired for a full time job with that same organization. What does the forecast reveal? Among the occupations with the most growth opportunity are:

  • librarian
  • network systems analyst
  • speech language pathologist
  • engineering manager
  • registered nurse
  • market research analyst
  • biological technician
  • physical, respiratory and occupational therapist
  • public relations specialist.
  • The occupations you want to stay away from (at least if you want a better than average shot at finding work) are telemarketer, photographic processing machine operator, file clerk, computer operator, order clerk, electrician, mail clerk and switchboard operator.

    WEDDLE’s announced a fast-acting and effective antidote to slower hiring in a slow economy. It’s WEDDLE’s WIZNotes-Fast Facts on Job Boards. These books are a quick reference to job openings on the Internet and an inexpensive job search aid. Each WIZNotes includes compact, but complete profiles of the key sites that specialize in a specific career field or employment situation. There are WIZNotes for:

  • Sales & Marketing professionals,
  • Finance & Accounting professionals,
  • Engineering professionals,
  • Human Resource professionals,
  • Scientists
  • Women Professionals
  • Managers & Executives,
  • and

  • Recent Graduates.
  • Plus, there are WIZNotes on:

  • Finding a Job on the Web
  • Writing a Great Resume
  • All you have to do is select the WIZNotes that’s right for you. Each volume has exactly the information you need to find the right job boards and career portals for you. And best of all, at $12.95 each, WEDDLE’s WIZNotes are a bargain to boot! To order your WIZNotes, click on the link to your left or call 317.598.9768. Order today!

    Section Three: Site Profiles

    Site Spotlite … from the pages of WEDDLE’s 2007/8 Guides and Directories

    There are 50,000 job boards now in operation in North America and an equal number operating elsewhere around the world. The key to a successful online job search, therefore, is knowing where to find and how to select the best sites for your specific employment objective. WEDDLE’s 2007/8 Guide identifies 350 of the top sites worldwide and provides the information you need to determine which job boards will deliver the best opportunities for you. For example:

    SnagAJob.com

    http://www.snagajob.com

    Post full time jobs: Yes

    Post part time, contract or consulting jobs: Yes-All

    Distribution of jobs: National-USA

    Number of jobs: 112,000+

    Salary levels of jobs: Hourly, $20-30K/yr

    Offer a job agent: Yes

    Resume database: Yes-Profiles

    How long are resumes stored: Indefinitely

    Restrictions on who can post: None

    Other services for job seekers: Assessment instruments, Career information, Links to other sites with job search/career resources

    Member, International Association of Employment Web Sites: Yes

    Please Support Our Sponsor: WEDDLE’s Books

    This issue of WEDDLE’s newsletter is brought to you through the generous support of WEDDLE’s Guides and Directory, the leading reference books for online job search success.

    You can follow the herd and go to the same job boards everyone else is visiting online or you can shop smart and find the job boards that are best suited for you. You can add your application to the hundreds of others being submitted for the jobs everyone else is seeing or you can find the special opportunities posted at lesser known job boards and career portals. The choice is yours.

    If you want to take the path less traveled and find a great job online, you’ll need the gold standard of job board guides: WEDDLE’s. WEDDLE’s publications are your road map to the best of the 50,000+ job boards now operating on the Internet. WEDDLE’s books include:

  • WEDDLE’s 2007/8 Guide to Employment Sites on the Internet. Called the “Zagat of the online employment industry” by the American Staffing Association, it provides full-page profiles of 350 of the best job boards in a range of occupations, industries and locations;
  • WEDDLE’s 2007/8 Directory of Employment Related Internet Sites. The “address book of the online employment industry,” it lists over 9,000 sites and organizes them by the career fields, industries and geographies on which they focus; and
  • WEDDLE’s 2007/8 Guide to Association Web Sites. The key to the “hidden job market” online, it details the employment resources and capabilities that are provided at the Web-sites of over 1,900 associations and societies.
  • These books are a smart investment for the smart professional. They provide a real and important competitive advantage in your search for a great job during a difficult economy. So, don’t delay! Click on the link to your left or call WEDDLE’s at 317.598.9768 and place your order today.