See the Movie, But Avoid Gravity in Your Career

See the Movie, But Avoid Gravity in Your Career

You’ve probably heard about the new blockbuster movie, Gravity.  I haven’t seen it, but the trailers suggest that the flick is actually about the absence of gravity.  Which got me to thinking, what does the absence of gravity do to a career and what should you do about it?

Here’s a truism of career self-management.  What weighs you down squeezes your future.  What holds you in place flattens your career.  Gravity is the enemy of success.

How do you avoid it?  As I explain in The Career Fitness Workbook, the single best tool is a quarterly personal performance review.

What’s the purpose of this self-assessment?  It’s not to evaluate what you’ve done for your employer – that’s the purpose of its performance appraisal – but rather, to determine whether you’ve done anything for yourself.  In the last 90 days, have you added any new knowledge, skills or contacts that will enable you to express and experience more of your innate talent in your work.

Why is that important?  Because the more of your talent you bring to work, the greater the weightlessness of your career.

Thanks for reading,
Peter

2 Comments

  1. It’s true that you need to have flexibility, but I would hesitate to say that “what holds you in place flattens your career”. I think everyone needs a solid foundation; be that a positive home life, a spouse/significant other, or just a truly solid friend. I think everyone needs something to ground them in order to succeed. Other wise they may find themselves floating aimlessly…

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  2. Hi Meg, thanks for your comment. Your point is well made. We all need the foundation of relationships – as recent research in positive psychology has discovered, they create joy which is one-half of a healthy life. The other half is happiness, a cognitive state best achieved at work. In order to realize that state, however, we must constantly push out the boundaries of our talent and its expression on-the-job. It was to that imperative for movement that my phrase referred.

    Peter