The Career Activist Republic

The Career Activist Republic

The Career Activist Republic is not a political organization or an organized labor movement. It is an assembly as America’s Founding Fathers intended. And, like other assemblies—the Green Nation and the Red Sox Nation, for example—its membership is voluntary and shares a common outlook and sometimes, even a common vocabulary—just listen to the way Red Sox fans describe players for the New York Yankees.

Unlike those assemblies, however, the Career Activist Republic isn’t driven by what people want to be. It is energized by who they are. It is an assembly of people devoted to expressing and experiencing their essential selves. Their talent.

The Career Activist Republic is a state of mind. Career activists may be proactive and energetic people in the world of work, but their community is being built with an outlook—a way of seeing themselves and their career. It is based on a belief in the potential and potency of their inherent capability—their talent—and a determination to apply that gift in whatever profession, craft or trade they may select. They see the workplace not as a cage which locks them into a static and spiritless career, but as a dynamic environment where they can (and must) chart their own course toward goals which are meaningful and rewarding for them.

Career activists don’t take an oath or sign a piece of paper to confirm their citizenship in their Republic. They take a far braver step. They give themselves permission to believe:
• in their own independence—they will not permit others to determine the course of their career
and
• in the sanctity of the capability with which they were endowed—they will not allow their talent to be ignored or debased.
Career activists are, in short, proactive visionaries of the best they can be, the best they intend to be, and the best they are.

An Economy of Talent, By Talent and With Talent

Career activism may be a state of mind, but it creates a very tangible reality. It establishes a new and historic structure for the American workplace. The rise of career activism ends the nation’s 20th Century flirtation with contracts and collective bargaining and returns it to the legitimate source of its prosperity—its citizens’ heritage of individual responsibility and initiative. America was and is the land of the free and the home of the brave, not the land of union rules and the home of card carrying members.

The Career Activist Republic replaces America’s industrial era labor mentality with a modern marketplace—a 21st Century phenomenon—an economy of talent, by talent and with talent. Its citizens can never be underbid by cheap labor overseas. They can never be overwhelmed by automation. They are impregnable because they live in the one country on earth where their talent is nurtured by the talent of all the world’s people. Their talent is unmatched because their republic is unlimited. It is open to everyone.

This newest of democracies reaffirms the United States of America as the world’s leader. It establishes this position, however, not with the might of its military force, but with the creativity, innovation and intellect of a liberated workforce. A strong military will always be essential to the security of a free people, but in today’s turbulent global marketplace, the quality and durability of their standard of living depends upon an economy of talent.

The Career Activist Republic realizes the power and promise of such an economy. In effect, it creates a new currency for the United States of America. The country took itself off the gold standard in 1971. The dollar hasn’t been backed by any precious metal since then. As one pundit put it, the greenback has become an “IOU nothing.”

The Career Activist Republic corrects that decline in worth. It revalues the dollar by putting it on the talent standard. It’s not yet convertible everywhere—the Republic, itself, is only now just emerging—but increasingly, America’s creditors recognize that the dollar is backed by a resource even more precious than gold or silver. It is backed by the talent of a free and vibrant people.

Note: If you’d like to join the Career Activist Republic, click here.

Thanks for Reading,
Peter

Note: The above post was drawn in part from my new book, The Career Activist Republic. To read more, get the book at Amazon.com, in many bookstores and on Weddles.com.

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